Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘prairie’

I am chasing the winter blues.

It’s hard to create a work of art when you are feeling under the weather.  Fever and delirium make sentences nonsensical. Your spirit seems to float away from your body – out of this world.  You feel completely disconnected. The most talented of artists use the dark times in their lives to create beauty.  It takes fortitude and resilience to recover from illness let alone create art. 

I haven’t been feeling well – not at all. 

I am not a good patient.  I do not like being under the weather, I’d rather be in it, outside in nature.

The blues are pulling at me like a magnet.  I can see them from my window. They taunt me as they dance and skip along the snow drifts daring me to catch them.

The day is early.  The sun is only beginning to rise.  I slog into my winter gear surprised that I am not collapsing under its weight and head out the door.

The air hangs softly in the distance a paler color of white than the snow lying on the ground. ‘Angel’s breath,’ I smile at the thought of it as some blue disappears with the sun’s first rays.

‘Most people chase rainbows in order to discover magic and I’m out chasing the blues. But, why limit one’s self,’ I think bemused. (more…)

Read Full Post »

A pale dawn arises,

Snow falls,

Sullen shadows cascade across the land,

Images cold against glittering drifts,

A terrain flash-frozen,

No layers of warmth will cushion heartaches pain,

In winter,

When the wind bites,

Nostalgia quietly visits.

 

Thank-you for following, reading, sharing and commenting – The Trefoil Muse

Read Full Post »

When it’s 32 degrees Celsius (86.9 F) but feels like 36 (96.8 F) and a sirocco is blowing across the prairie; you know that Mother Nature’s dehydrator has kicked in.  During such heat waves, one must be sure to drink plenty of fluids and attempt to stay cool – hydration is the key unless you want to whither up like a piece of dried up old jerky!

Many people suffer immeasurably during summer months due to the onslaught of intense, desert like heat waves so they head to a body of water or a beach to help keep their body hydrated and their heads cool.

Hydrotherapy is the use of water to treat a disease or to maintain health.

The theory behind hydrotherapy is that water has many properties that give it the ability to heal. Water can store and carry heat and energy. Likewise, water can cool. It can also dissolve other substances, such as minerals and salts.

Hydrotherapy, formerly called hydropathy or water cure, is a branch of alternative medicine, occupational therapy, and physiotherapy, that involves the use of water for pain relief and treatment.

Drinking water also assists in maintaining mental clarity but, the sound of water can be calming and bring a sense of balance to one’s spirit when the day is just too hot to handle.

If my mental demeanor is at stake because life has become too fiery, I find the sound of water soothing. However, when Mother Nature’s dehydrator is full throttle, I enjoy going for a nice cool swim in order to refresh, calm and maintain my health.

Water heals.

The picture below is my idea of hydrotherapy on a day where it’s 32 degrees Celsius but feels like 34 with a dehydrating sirocco breeze on the prairie.

 

If a sirocco visits your area firing up your daily life until it’s too hot to handle, try hydrotherapy.

Ease your pain; take the first step; get wet; just plunge in; let water heal you.

 

 

Thank-you for following, reading, sharing and commenting – The Trefoil Muse

Read Full Post »

Read Full Post »

I have no words today.

I’ve been off…

Gathering;

Sights,

Sounds,

Smells,

From an acrid landscape once purple on the horizon now turned emerald green.

Humidity drips from the atmosphere, as wildflowers dance and sway, perfuming the breeze.

The air is filled with music the song birds sing as they perch on branches laden with berries these bushes bring.

Bees hum in harmony in tune with the song, collecting sweet nectar as they work along.

On the grassland beyond, graze antelope and deer. 

And, a coyote and pups yip happily from their den near here.

I lay back quietly on this quilt made of grass and soak in the scene as I contemplate what words would describe what happiness means. 

So grateful am I for the serenity this Prairie Oasis brings.

Yes, I must apologize for my lack of words,

 And, as for descriptions,

There’s simply not one single thing to describe,

Peace

On

Earth.

I’m off today, gathering – words.

 

 

Thank-you for following, reading, sharing and commenting – The Trefoil Muse

Read Full Post »

A few weeks ago during the last few days of a long drought, we had an early morning visitor arrive for coffee. 

When a moose appears on your doorstep, intent on sharing your morning cup of coffee,  it is always a special and sacred gift.  Moose are predominately solitary animals who are able to survive within any territory be it on lands such as forests, and prairies, or wet areas such as rivers, swamps or lakes.

The moose is an animal of contradictions.  It seems awkward and strange yet it is a majestic creature with tremendous grace despite its ungainliness. Moose have an undeniable sense of self and the simple fact that they are able to survive in any territory means that they have developed much wisdom.  We found ourselves very fortunate to receive this visitor for coffee and take part in the medicine it offered.

Moose are associated with the north direction on the Medicine Wheel.  The north direction represents wisdom.  Self-esteem is the medicine of Moose because it represents and recognizes that balanced power has been used in a situation and that you should be congratulated. 

The core of Moose medicine is in knowing the wisdom of silence, so that when it is proper to speak you can take pride in your words.

The Moose is a revered animal in the, “Great White North,” otherwise known as, “Canada.”

Canada just had its 155 year celebration on July 1st, 2022.

Moose Milk; is a traditional Canadian cocktail with its roots in historical celebrations.  The Royal Canadian NavyRoyal Canadian Air Force, and Canadian Army all claim to be the originators of the drink.

My exposure to Moose Milk has only been medicinal.  It was a remedy used by my family to cure the common cold.  It was a hot drink served in a coffee cup. The recipe consisted of whiskey, brown sugar, cream and boiled water.  It has never failed to cure the most stubborn of head colds.  The traditional Canadian cocktail differs from the one our family used as it can not only be served hot but cold.

We love cold drinks during our summer season in Canada and in the spirit of our Dominion Day celebration I have added a cold libation for you to try.  It is a slightly different version of Moose Medicine, a bonus treat, to celebrate Canada’s 155th celebration.   See the recipe below for ice cold Moose Milk. I hope you enjoy it throughout the hot summer months ahead.

Please use wisdom when consuming alcohol. Try to refrain from damaging your self-esteem or that of another by speaking when you could simply remain silent.  Ask Moose to help you honor the gifts you can give and recognize your worthiness into the future.  Remember to congratulate yourself for your successes in life.  Enjoy!

Thank-you for following, reading, sharing and commenting – The Trefoil Muse

 

Read Full Post »

Like Old Mother Hubbard, I had nothing in my cupboard. It was bare – and our barnyard was empty too.

I had a hankering for some fresh eggs and at the price of eggs today, well; it felt more frugal to get some chickens than drive to the store and buy a carton of eggs.

I missed having chickens.  There are so many things a person can do with eggs.  They were a staple in any kitchen.  It was a pity I was out.

If only I could get my hands on three or four layer chickens and perhaps a rooster… 

Hens lay eggs daily and if the rooster did his job perhaps one of the hens would go broody and hatch a few chicks. I smiled. It was a project worthy of dreaming about. Then again, why dream when one can make it a reality, it never costs anything to ask a question.  

(more…)

Read Full Post »

“Elk are powerful, adaptable animals that have played a significant role in cultural mythologies. Elk encounters are, for most people, rare,…

The elk represents dignity, power, inner strength, and passion. If you experience an elk sighting, it’s a message to stay steady on your current course. An elk sighting is also a reminder to be diligent and see things through. If you do, you will earn the respect of others for standing your ground. An elk sighting lets you know that because of hard work, you’re about to come into the life of plenty you’ve envisioned. This is a great reward for a job well done.” LJ Innes

Elk were introduced on a military base in Suffield, Alberta in 1997.  Since 1997, the population of the original elk herd has grown and so has the territory they now occupy in Alberta such as the prairie. My home on the prairie is just a few hours away from the Suffield base.  Elk can cross a lot of territory in a few minutes.  They have immense stamina; this coupled with their long-legged stride enables them to out distance predators with ease.

Elk encounters are, for most people, rare – so I count myself as a very fortunate part of the few who have encountered prairie elk.

The first time I saw elk on our property was mid-October, about 3 years ago, just after returning from a safari in Africa.  I have to admit, observing a herd of elk from the comfort of my own home was every bit as exciting as the safari!

The bull in charge of the herd was magnificent! He had the largest set of antlers I have ever seen! He was accompanied by about 30 cows and their calves.  It was bow hunting season so no doubt this herd, was fleeing the bow and arrow hunters.

The elk herd was tired when they arrived at our yard.  Some of the cows were limping and a few calves were exhausted. The bull let them rest and graze here for about half an hour before bugling then rounding them up and moving on.  It only took a few minutes for the entire herd to disappear into the horizon beyond my line of sight.  I imagine, they had successfully out distanced the bow hunter’s long before arriving here.

Normally, bulls and cows keep with their own sex.  It is only during the rut that bulls and cows intermingle.  We have had 5 or so nice looking bulls steadily visit us over the years but until last week we hadn’t seen the main herd again.

Until last week, that is.

It was at dusk and we counted about 30 cows.  See the pictures below:

I was so excited the elk were visiting that it was hard to hold my cell phone still enough to get a few pictures to share. 

Elk is wonderful species of wildlife that lives and breathes out here on the prairie. And, while they don’t visit often; I am always excited to see them. The next time they come through, though, I’m hoping to diligently count a few calves.

As a power animal, elk can remind us that we have enough stamina and strength to go the distance. We only need to pace ourselves and take time to rest along the way to achieve our goals.

 

Thank-you for following, reading, sharing and commenting – The Trefoil Muse

Read Full Post »

“Who let the dogs out?”

The Sun let the dogs out!

Obviously, the Sun’s dogs needed out for a good run, perhaps they’d been penned up for too long of a stretch or maybe they just needed to get out and howl at the full moon last week.  Dogs can be very insistent when they want outside.  Madam Sun probably coined the term, ‘hounded!’  In which case, I am totally able to relate to her or even sympathize!

Dog Owner Beware!

(more…)

Read Full Post »

The horse and rider paused at the crest of the hill.

“Should we take the wagon trail home or cut through the coulee, Mari-bell?” Sarah asked unsure of her own mind.  If they took the wagon trail, it would take her another 5 miles to reach the ranch, an easy ride in good weather like it had been that morning but potentially deadly in the inclement weather which had suddenly appeared.  She wasn’t prepared for this.

It had been unusually mild weather for January, like a spring day – they called these warm winds Chinooks she’d been told. They were “snow eaters,” that lasted from hours to days.  Water had been dripping from the barn roof forming streamlets and pockets of water on her path to the barn.  She side-stepped numerous puddles on the way to retrieve her little golden mare with creamy mane and tail.  Mari-bell had nickered her usual soft greeting when Sarah opened the barn door.

She had loved Mari-bell from the first moment she’d laid eyes on her.   Her father had threatened to sell her at first.  “Too small for any of the ranch hands,” he’d said but Sarah rallied for the little palomino.  “The horse has a huge heart,” he’d admitted after seeing the girl and horse work cattle.  “She won’t quit until the job’s done and did everything and more that you asked of her Sarah!”  The girl and horse had an unnatural bond he figured after seeing how the two responded to one another. In the end, he relented and gave the mare to his daughter. It was a rarity not to see the horse and girl together now-a-days.

Mari-bell perked her ears forward and arched her neck over the edge of the stall as Sarah approached.  “Too warm for this thick woolen sweater Mother knit for me at Christmas that’s for sure Mari-bell,” Sarah crooned to the horse as she shed her jacket then removed the heavy sweater and hung it on the peg by the stall.  “A long sleeved shirt and jacket are all I’ll need today.”  She grinned as she pat the horse on the side of the neck, led her to the door of the barn, mounted and trotted away from the ranch toward the school.

How she wished she still had that sweater now! (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: